Wednesday, July 30, 2014
cadarnle:

derryderrydown:

clanwilliam:

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Air Pioneer
Lettice Curtis had her pilot’s license for only three years when she was recruited to Britain’s Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA) in 1940. The ATA’s sole mission was to ferry aircraft in and around the British Isles to make them accessible for members of the Royal Air Force. A shortage of male pilots forced the ATA to invite women to join, and Ms. Curtis was one of the first.
She was also the best. During her five years of service Ms. Curtis transported more than 1500 aircraft. Everything from Spitfire fighter planes, to the two-engine multi-purpose Mosquito, to the Lancaster four-engine bomber, had to be flown by Ms. Curtis, often solo and using only a map for navigation. Ms. Curtis was, in fact, the first woman in the world to qualify to fly four-engine bombers including the American B-17 Flying Fortress. She gained national attention in October 1942 when she met and shook hands with Eleanor Roosevelt and Clementine Churchill. 
Ms. Curtis was one of 166 women served in the ATA, which was dubbed ”Always Terrified Airwomen” by cynical journalists when the program was first expanded. The pilots came not just from the United Kingdom but also the U.S., The Netherlands, and Poland. Fifteen women lost their lives while serving in the ATA, a remarkably low death rate for pilots asked to fly at all hours and in all types of weather.a
After the end of World War II, Ms. Curtis hoped to fly in a professional setting but with the end of the war came the end of a need for women pilots. Like so many other women of the era Ms. Curtis was pushed aside to make room for the men returning from the front. While interviewing for a test pilot position with one company, she heard and entire boardroom break into laughter when told she was waiting in the lobby.
Ms. Curtis found her way airborn by participating in the air racing circuit. And she continued to excel. Flying in a borrowed Spitfire, Ms. Curtis set a women’s record in the 100 km closed loop race in 1948. Later, in her own private plane, she raced nationally against all pilots, male and female.
Later in life, she also took it upon herself to tell the story of the ATA and wrote The Forgotten Pilots which was published in 1971. She wrote her autobiography, Lettice Curtis, in 2004.
In 2008, Ms. Curtis and fourteen other surviving women who flew for the ATA were honored by the British government for their service in the war with a special patch. (The men of the ATA were recognized as well.) “The Forgotten Pilots” had finally gotten their due.
Lettice Curtis, who earned her helicopter pilot’s license at the age of 77, died on July 21, 2014 at the age of 99.
Sources: Telegraph, The Guardian, The Daily Mail, and Wikipedia
(Image of Lettice Curtis stepping into the cockpit of a Spitfire sometime during World War II is courtesy of The Daily Mail)
Other women pilots featured on Obit of the Day:
Nadhezda Popova - One of the Sovet Union’s “Night Witches”
Betty Skelton - Dubbed “The Fastest Woman on Earth”
Patricia Wilson - Member of Philadelphia’s Civil Air Defense in WWII

The ATA Girls (pronounced Atta-girl, their preferred nickname) were amazing.
They earned the same amount as the men, a very rare, if not unique, situation.
Diana Barnato (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diana_Barnato_Walker) practised for her test by driving her car on the road next to an airfield to reacquaint herself with airspeeds when she was invited to join.
She also said the uniforms were a nightmare because the women (one in eight of the ATA) had to fly in skirts for a long time. So they didn’t wear parachutes, since the idea of showing your knickers was worse than dying in a plane crash - more seriously, parachute straps dividing a woolen utility skirt? Chafing, distracting, body limiting.
She landed a badly damaged plane because she refused to bail out. It was only when she landed that she realised the entire bottom of the plane had gone - the ground crew were in awe.
And the most famous member of the ATA (remember that 8 men to 1 woman ratio) sadly lost her life there. For US peeps, Amy Johnson (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amy_Johnson) was basically the UK’s equivalent of Amelia Earhart.

For a more recent book about the ATA, I recommend Spitfire Women of World War II by Giles Whittell.

Don’t forget either that the ATA women flew unarmed — there was no ammunition in their guns despite the near constant threat of Luftwaffe fighters and bombers over Britain, because of the establishment belief that it was inappropriate to permit women to fight.

cadarnle:

derryderrydown:

clanwilliam:

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Air Pioneer

Lettice Curtis had her pilot’s license for only three years when she was recruited to Britain’s Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA) in 1940. The ATA’s sole mission was to ferry aircraft in and around the British Isles to make them accessible for members of the Royal Air Force. A shortage of male pilots forced the ATA to invite women to join, and Ms. Curtis was one of the first.

She was also the best. During her five years of service Ms. Curtis transported more than 1500 aircraft. Everything from Spitfire fighter planes, to the two-engine multi-purpose Mosquito, to the Lancaster four-engine bomber, had to be flown by Ms. Curtis, often solo and using only a map for navigation. Ms. Curtis was, in fact, the first woman in the world to qualify to fly four-engine bombers including the American B-17 Flying Fortress. She gained national attention in October 1942 when she met and shook hands with Eleanor Roosevelt and Clementine Churchill. 

Ms. Curtis was one of 166 women served in the ATA, which was dubbed ”Always Terrified Airwomen” by cynical journalists when the program was first expanded. The pilots came not just from the United Kingdom but also the U.S., The Netherlands, and Poland. Fifteen women lost their lives while serving in the ATA, a remarkably low death rate for pilots asked to fly at all hours and in all types of weather.a

After the end of World War II, Ms. Curtis hoped to fly in a professional setting but with the end of the war came the end of a need for women pilots. Like so many other women of the era Ms. Curtis was pushed aside to make room for the men returning from the front. While interviewing for a test pilot position with one company, she heard and entire boardroom break into laughter when told she was waiting in the lobby.

Ms. Curtis found her way airborn by participating in the air racing circuit. And she continued to excel. Flying in a borrowed Spitfire, Ms. Curtis set a women’s record in the 100 km closed loop race in 1948. Later, in her own private plane, she raced nationally against all pilots, male and female.

Later in life, she also took it upon herself to tell the story of the ATA and wrote The Forgotten Pilots which was published in 1971. She wrote her autobiography, Lettice Curtis, in 2004.

In 2008, Ms. Curtis and fourteen other surviving women who flew for the ATA were honored by the British government for their service in the war with a special patch. (The men of the ATA were recognized as well.) “The Forgotten Pilots” had finally gotten their due.

Lettice Curtis, who earned her helicopter pilot’s license at the age of 77, died on July 21, 2014 at the age of 99.

Sources: Telegraph, The Guardian, The Daily Mail, and Wikipedia

(Image of Lettice Curtis stepping into the cockpit of a Spitfire sometime during World War II is courtesy of The Daily Mail)

Other women pilots featured on Obit of the Day:

Nadhezda Popova - One of the Sovet Union’s “Night Witches”

Betty Skelton - Dubbed “The Fastest Woman on Earth”

Patricia Wilson - Member of Philadelphia’s Civil Air Defense in WWII

The ATA Girls (pronounced Atta-girl, their preferred nickname) were amazing.

They earned the same amount as the men, a very rare, if not unique, situation.

Diana Barnato (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diana_Barnato_Walker) practised for her test by driving her car on the road next to an airfield to reacquaint herself with airspeeds when she was invited to join.

She also said the uniforms were a nightmare because the women (one in eight of the ATA) had to fly in skirts for a long time. So they didn’t wear parachutes, since the idea of showing your knickers was worse than dying in a plane crash - more seriously, parachute straps dividing a woolen utility skirt? Chafing, distracting, body limiting.

She landed a badly damaged plane because she refused to bail out. It was only when she landed that she realised the entire bottom of the plane had gone - the ground crew were in awe.

And the most famous member of the ATA (remember that 8 men to 1 woman ratio) sadly lost her life there. For US peeps, Amy Johnson (http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amy_Johnson) was basically the UK’s equivalent of Amelia Earhart.

For a more recent book about the ATA, I recommend Spitfire Women of World War II by Giles Whittell.

Don’t forget either that the ATA women flew unarmed — there was no ammunition in their guns despite the near constant threat of Luftwaffe fighters and bombers over Britain, because of the establishment belief that it was inappropriate to permit women to fight.

stoney321:

shiningartifact:

teenwolf:

So beautiful…I can’t even

Those eyebrows just won seventeen Emmys.

CAN WE TALK ABOUT DEREK HALE, WEAK AND DEFENSELESS (sorta) STUMBLING ON THE ANNIHILATION OF YET ANOTHER WEREWOLF CLAN? AND KATE ARGENT IS BACK IN THE PICTURE?

CAN WE TALK ABOUT HOW SCARED THIS MUST HAVE MADE HIM FEEL? THE FLASHBACKS HE MUST HAVE HAD?

Because this is where the episode actually broke something in me, honestly, when I saw that Tyler Hoechlin was thinking that AND THE SHOW WASN’T.

*shoves all the awards at TH*

minim-calibre:

rutgerhauer-favoriteactor:

Rutger Hauer as a medieval knight in one of the best fantasy films ever made “Ladyhawke” (1985) directed by Richard Donner.

One more interesting fact:

Several different hawks were used. One to sit on Rutger Hauer’s arm and another for the flying scenes. A third proved to be mostly unusable, as it enjoyed Hauers company so much that it would ruffle it feathers when seated on his arm, making it look more like a chicken than a stately hawk.

I wish I could watch this movie again and enjoy it, but the soundtrack has not aged well. 

Maybe I could watch with the sound off and the subtitles on?

Tuesday, July 29, 2014
monkeywriter:

Love it

monkeywriter:

Love it

(Source: teenwolf)

teenwolf:

So beautiful…I can’t even

TEEN WOLF: priorities

helenish:

Y’all expect me to care about Peter Hale, Kate Argent, dumb plans, Nikes, and teenaged assassins when:

Sheriff Stilinski is in the hospital??

Derek Hale is SOLVING MYSTERIES??

Derek Hale is at makeout point with Malia???

Derek Hale is in TERRIFYING LIFE DANGER?????

I can’t talk about some of the other things that happened in this episode because they were too violent and upsetting: I guess I thought it was sort of wildly uneven to have some (A LOT) of folks dying violent sad lonely deaths and some folks being saved from certain death by being cut open by a scalpel, this cutting being extremely urgent but also convenient to whenever they were rescued or whatever.

That jump cut to Deaton right after THE BENEFACTORRRRRR was some mighty suspicious and also too-obvious foreshadowing, right? Eh, I don’t care.

WHY WASN’T MELISSA AT THE HOSPITAL, DID NO ONE CALL HER, DOES MELISSA NOT HAVE ANY FRIENDS??? “Melissa, honey, you might want to come in, your handsome main squeeze just came into the ER. Oh, also that deadbeat husband of yours.”

Sometimes it seems as though this show is concocted using an old game of Clue that they’ve marked up with the character names and shuffled at random, e.g. THIS EPISODE: 

- Chris & Scott at the old Argent Factory for Making (Unspecified) Things. Please let Chris Argent be an Ice Cream Baron or something. ARGENT BRAND PIZZA BAGELS.

- Malia & Derek: wandering around the woods in the middle of the night even though Malia left school during what is obviously THE DAY, what were they doing, lying around eating Argent Brand Pizza Bagels all afternoon?

- Stiles & Lydia - FINE THAT MAKES SENSE

- Tiny Wolf plus the ten million hours least suspenseful hours ever watching a guy dig his fingers into the same ten wet stones, WERE WE EVER ACTUALLY WORRIED ABOUT TINY ANGRY WOLF AT ALL, you know Scott was going to save him, just like yOU KNOW that now that they’ve gone and said Derek’s gonna die, he’s not going to die. At all. Right? RIGHT. 

Can I just talk about Derek Hale and how I’m glad he solves mysteries and retains a sense of purpose in life, but being all oh, They use a Buddhist mantra, let’s go to the eastern-most point in Beacon Hills makes no sense!!! NO SENSE AT ALL!!! You can’t solve mysteries by just extrapolating random facts and turning out to be right!!! That’s not how mysteries work at all. 

Peter’s evil head tilt makes it look like he has some sort of serious ear mange for which he needs immediate treatment.

best summary so far!

archiemcphee:

This awesome arboreal dwelling is the Living the High Life Tree House created by Blue Forest, a British tree house design and construction firm. It’s a luxury family-sized complex featuring two separate tree houses, one for kids and one for their parents. The elevated dwellings are connected by a network of rope bridges which also lead to an adventure play area and an assault course, the latter of which is also accessible via an 80-yard zip line.

It may look rustic, but this is a top-of-the-line tree house. The kids’ house features three medieval towers, and inside one of them a concealed hatch in the upper floor leads to a secret game room containing a plasma TV and video game console. Meanwhile the grown-ups’ treehouse features a conical thatched roof and interior walls made of hand-split oak shingles and cedar tongue-and-groove boards. Inside there’s a kitchen (complete with plenty of wine storage), bathroom, and a large open living area for treetop entertaining. The complex also features accommodations for guests of the family.

Head over to the Blue Forest website to check out more of their amazing custom-built tree houses.

[via designboom]

Monday, July 28, 2014

wolfspirals:

Brittany Snow is frustrated by her shoes. Tyler Posey thinks she should wear his. [x]

This whole vid is totes adorable.  Though if I were leaving a party after a night out, with a bunch of friends - possibly several sheets to the wind - and some twit was filming us I doubt if I’d handle it with as much grace and as many smiles as these folks do.